How A Disaster Recovery Strategy Prepares For The Worst

July 17, 2013 by John Pidge No Comments »
Data Center

Data Center (Photo credit: bandarji)

Typically, a company includes a list of potential risks when drafting a disaster recovery plan. After identifying these risks, the next step is to assess the damage that could be associated with those risks. This is one of the more difficult portions of disaster recovery planning. This is simply because businesses cannot accurately assess the damage associated with particular risks. It is recommended that companies use a disaster recovery service, rather than attempt in-house recovery, for that very reason.

Why Disaster Recovery? Why Assess the Damage?

A lot of companies skip the step of assessing the potential damage for disaster recovery risks. Though it may seem grim, assessing what damage a risk can create is crucial to be prepared for an event. When a disaster recovery plan does not have protocols for handling a particular risk or threat, a business cannot recover effectively.

One Cause, Multiple Effects

Businesses should realize that all risks will have more than one effect. For example, if a building suffers from a fire there will be multiple effects associated with that fire. Therefore, each risk assessed should have its multiple effects listed in the disaster recovery plan. Then a protocol should be created for handling them. Using the fire example, consider the following:

Structural Damage

The building will ultimately have structural damage. In some instances, the entire building will be destroyed and all of the contents gone with it. The disaster recovery plan would need to devise a backup location to house the workforce. In addition, protocols need to address how to handle the hardware, furniture and other interior items that are damaged.

Disruption of Power

When a fire breaks out, power will be cut off. In this situation, the company’s servers and networks can lose essential power to function. Therefore, the disaster recovery plan should implement a protocol for backup power supply or a backup storage location.

Inability to Work

When there is no physical location to report to, where will employees go? Disaster recovery plans need to account for the employee factor. Employees should have a backup office location or work-from-home plan if disaster incapacitates the company’s physical location. Data centres are a good solution for this problem.

Telecommunications Failure

A disaster would most likely wipe out all telecommunications. The business cannot contact employees, clients or even vendors from its office location. Therefore, the plan should implement a procedure for how to handle the telecommunications failure, such as a backup location.

Data Systems Destroyed

Fires will destroy data systems quickly. The disaster recovery plan should have a backup data centre or storage location where critical system information will be stored. It should be able to be easily accessed for quick recovery.

When a business creates a thorough disaster recovery plan, the chances of it staying out of commission are relatively low. In order to create an accurate plan, the business needs to honestly assess its risks. It also must honestly assess the impact those risks will have on its ability to operate. From there, a plan on how to act when disaster strikes and how to counteract the effects of that disaster can be drafted. This plan will be the difference between being closed for a short time and being closed for good.

 
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