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Who’s gonna be at the ISE 2014 – Integrated Systems Europe

ISE Logo

ISE 2014 in Amsterdam RAI

It is that time of the year again and they come from all over the place. Manufacturers, installers, solution architects and everyone interested in Audio Visual and electronic system technology. And they all seek to get the latest news on their own hot topics.

So from the 4th through to the 6th of February will be this years ISE fair in Amsterdam. Ever since 2004 a great annual event to meet old partners and make new acquaintances alike throughout the Audio Visual business. If you seek to:

  • See the latest developments in technology
  • Trial new products
  • Network and mingle with people like you
  • Spot new break-through companies or solutions
  • Drink a coffee at every booth and corner

… then this is for you.

Who is going to be at the ISE 2014?

To name only a few of the exhibitors please find our quick list below:

Get the total overview of the 952 exhibitors at the official ISE 2014 homepage.

I wish all of you, who are going a lot of fun there and make sure you drop us your comments below. If you cannot be there, make sure to follow the ISE 2014 Social Channels on Twitter for updates live from the scene.


ISE in 60 Seconds (Footage of 2013)

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbZkbB8Djvs&w=575]

Raffle – 100 Articles on Telepresence24.com

Dear readers, we have truly anticipated this moment and we would like to use this opportunity to also thank each and every one of you for reading our articles, contributing in the discussion and even guest blogging. It is you, for who we are doing this and it is the exciting moments that we share with you, that keep us going.

To celebrate the 100th published article, we are doing a raffle among our email subscribers. You can win an Amazon.com Gift Card with the value of 50 $ (US) or equal value of your local Amazon store, if you are outside of the United States.

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How to join the raffle?

If you are already a subscriber, you’re all set and ready. If you do not yet follow us via email subscription, please sign up using the widget on the right side or just visit our subscribing page.

When will it happen?

The raffle will happen on Friday the 4th of October and the winner will receive a notification to the same email address, which they have also signed up with.

Who can participate?

Everybody can – Feel free to pass this to friends and colleagues or anyone who is interested in Unified Communications and Collaboration.

IPv6 and its Impact on Videoconferencing

I’m sure most of the people working with technology are familiar with the terms IPv4 and IPv6. In a nutshell – every device connected on a network (Internet or private network) requires an IP address in order to “communicate” to other devices. The current standard for these addresses is called IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4), and it forms the foundation of most Internet communication today. IPv4 however suffers from several important shortfalls, most importantly the lack of sufficient address space. For that reason, IPv6 was developed which introduces a number of other improvements especially to QoS (Quality of Service) and Security.

ipv6, ipv4, ip, internet, protocol, stone, mural, prophecy, version, 4, 6, four, six, crayon, chalk, circle, visualisation, visualziation, addresses, available

Visualisation on how we are running out of IPv4 addresses (Photo: Abode of Chaos)

In order to utilize a device for a video conference, regardless whether it is a high end video codec or a smartphone, that device needs to be connected to a network, so naturally it will require an IP address. Without going in too much technical details, but still mentioning the most important terms,  let’s see how IPv6 features will affect video communication.

Huge address space

The most important benefit of IPv6 implementations is that it will provide virtually unlimited address space, by introducing 128-bit address, versus the 32-bit address used by IPv4. Just as an analogy, it will be enough to assign IPv6 address to every atom on the earth and still have enough left to do another 100+ earths. This will allow virtually any device in future to be assigned a globally reachable address, which in turn means that NAT (Network Address Translation) will be no longer necessary in the long term, and removing NAT from the equation will solve a lot of the interoperability issues in real-time services such as VoIP and Videoconferencing. It will also be possible to assign multiple network  addresses to devices which means they can stay connected to several different networks at the same time.

Improved Quality of Service (QoS)

Quality of Service refers to the ability of the network to prioritize certain traffic to other and is especially important to VoIP (Voice over IP) and Video Communication, since we don’t want to have any delay here. The way data is transmitted in today’s IP networks is in form of network packets. These packets consist of two parts: packet header – containing control information, and payload – containing the used data. IPv6 improves over IPv4 in terms of QoS is by introducing new field in the packet header called “Flow Label”. This  “label” is used to identify and prioritize certain packet flow, for eg. video stream and allows devices on the same path (routers, switches…) to read the flow label and take appropriate action based on it.

Plug-and-Play support

With IPv6, addresses can be assigned automatically and dynamically by the client device, by getting the network prefix from any router it finds and then generate the full IP address for that network, based on the hardware MAC address. This means there will be no need for DHCP servers like with IPv4, and also less configuration requirements.  DHCPv6 will of course still be available for assigning IPv6 addresses.

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Example of how IPv4 and IPv6 can look (by webopedia.com)

Improved Security

IPv6 will provide better security than IPv4 when it comes to authentication and encryption of the transmitted data. The main reason for that is IPsec – a security protocol that is mandatory for IPv6 systems, and only optional for IPv4 environments. IPsec is defined as a set of security standards, originally written as part of the IPv6 specifications, and allows data to be secured from the originating to the destination host (through the various network elements such as routers, gateways…) by maintaining data confidentiality, integrity and authentication at the network layer. Another security improvement comes from the fact that IPv6 subnets will be so large so any attempt for hackers to scan them searching for a specific host will be ineffective.

Improved Mobility

Mobility refers to the ability of a device to move between different IP networks and still maintain the same IP address. This is very important for IP enabled real-time communication services, no one wants to be disconnected from a call while moving from one physical location to another. For that purpose, the Mobile IP protocol was designed by IETF. This protocol was further enhanced with Mobile IPv6 and Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 (HMIPv6) which propose higher level of security and more efficient data transmitting.

Big packets and improved routing

Another benefit to visual communications is IPv6 support for very big packet payloads, up to 4 billion bytes (IPv4 supports up to 65535 bytes only). With bandwidth becoming cheaper and the increase in device processing power, supporting big packets delivery  will be important when dealing with high quality multimedia content of the future. Even though the packet can be a lot bigger than in IPv4 systems, the actual routing of the information is improved due to the simplified packet header and structured approach to addressing, which reduces the amount of information network routers must store and leads to faster packet forwarding.

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When should we implement IPv6 and with what approach? (Photo: ºNit Soto)

Migration considerations

When talking about IPv6 impact on the network, it is very important to consider the  migration strategy as well, from Ipv4 to IPv6. Basically there are three ways to manage this: dual-stack implementation where all the network components and devices support both IPv4 and IPv6, tunneling – is implementation method where IPv4 packets get encapsulated and transported over IPv6 network backbone, and proxy translation – where network border element performs the mapping of packets from one IP version to another.

Outlook

Most likely, providers and businesses will opt to upgrade the existing network infrastructure to dual stack in order to support both customers. Some network elements that do not support dual-stack mode will have to be upgraded or replaced and new infrastructure that will be deployed will have to support IPv6 dual stack from the beginning.

Each migration strategy will definitely introduce certain level of latency in the network, so that is just a reason more that all services must be properly tested before a production rollout.

This Is The Office Of The Future

Look into the future office

Image by EG Focus

The office of the future. The concept in itself is enticing, but what features will become customary of the modern design and how will it impact on productivity and general wellbeing? Current designs are perfectly good enough for present-day needs, with some embracing some unconventional decor which is thought to stimulate the creative mind. Future designs are however likely to profit from the inevitable technological progression of the future.

3D Printers

The ingenious 3D printer. The technique used involves the production of a three-dimensional object from a digital model. A large growth in their sales has seen a substantial drop in their price and a consequential rise in their commercial use.

3D printers can be used to virtually recreate anything, for example, draft product models for promotional use, and can be very handy if your business deals with the real items rather than virtual sales. It can mean an easier design and testing process, which could decrease the time to market, reducing the overall expenditure as a consequence.

Standing-up Desks

Recent research has shown that being seated for much of the day can increase the risk of developing chronic illnesses such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, as well as having negative effects on your posture. Office desks that require you to stand are a great initiative and are becoming increasingly more popular as more organisations try to fit back against lifestyle of physical inactivity.

There are now a large range of standing workstations in versatile designs for businesses that have shown a willingness to invest in the standing desk trend.

Robotic Technology

With respect to the prevalence of robots, today’s office is a far cry from the office of the future, which is likely to boast sophisticated robotic technology that will take task automation and productivity to a whole new level. A robotic future will allow employees to work remotely from home whilst still participating in the same human interactions of the office.

Although it is expensive to equip entire offices with technology of this kind, it boasts a highly modern approach to videoconferencing and newer designs are becoming increasingly more adept; automatically docking themselves to nearby charging stations and easily synchronising with employee schedules.

Touchscreen Panels

The offices of the future are very likely to incorporate touchscreen panels and interactive displays on tables and walls, completely eliminating the need for dials, keyboards and mouses. It is thought to be more space efficient, faster and to encourage digital productivity.

The simple swipe or tap of a screen will see you using an easier wireless setup to collaborate ideas with clients and co-workers as well as allowing simple adjustments of the office lighting and acoustics. Again, the growing use of touchscreens has led to a decrease in the marginal cost of touchscreen technology and hence its usage is now more viable.

Living Green Walls

Peculiar as it may sound, living green walls are simply walls that are covered in greenery or vegetation and can be incorporated as office partitions or as an alternative to the conventional unadorned office wall. As well as the foliage being a tasteful visual display, interior green walls offer a number of other benefits.

They are thought to combat Sick Building Syndrome (SBS), where occupants of a building experience acute health discomforts due to poor indoor air quality. It is expected to encourage the rate of fresh air exchange and discourage allergenic mould growth. Green walls are relatively low maintenance with automatic irrigation systems and are far more water-efficient in contrast to conventional ground plant growth. It eliminates the potential for soil-borne pathogens, are cleaner and can also boast beneficial insulating properties. Whatever your office preferences, the vertical garden fad is taking the office design by storm and is becoming ever more prevalent.

The office of the future is sure to contain features that are absent in the traditional office design.

What are your ideas with respect to the modern office of today? Comment below!

Software MCU Comparison – What does the market offer?

A Videoconference Multipoint Control Unit (MCU) is a crucial part of every serious Videoconference infrastructure. It’s a system used to connect multiple media streams into a single Videoconference, therefore very often the MCU is referred to as a “bridge”.

The traditional MCU is a DSP (digital signal processing) based hardware whose primary functionality is to decode all incoming media streams, compose a single stream for each far-end participant and finally re-encode that stream before sending it out, needless to say all this requires a huge amount of processing power. More over, hardware-based MCUs define scalability on a per-port basis, which means if we want to have more participants connected in a Videoconference at the same time, we need MCUs with more video ports i.e. more DSPs and DSP hardware does not come cheap.

LifeSize, UVC, Software MCU, BYOD, Tablet, Videoconference, Video Conference, VC, Telepresence, SmartVideo, Tablet, Remote Working, Cafe, coffee, outside, remote, starbucks

LifeSize UVC Multipoint used on a Tablet

That is why a lot of companies are turning their attention towards a new type of product when it comes to multipoint Videconferences – the so-called “software MCU” or soft-MCU. A soft-MCU serves the same purpose as the hardware-based, except that all the transcoding and signal processing is done in the software which introduces big advantages in terms of cost, scalability and flexibility.

The soft-MCU eliminates the need for DSP hardware and can run on virtualized servers on private or public clouds, therefore it is significantly cheaper to deploy than the expensive hardware MCU. In terms of scalability, customers can often just purchase the number of ports they require at the time and then scale up or down easily as the need changes. Software MCUs offer also more flexible deployment, updates and feature enhancements are easy and more frequent, which gives them advantage in today’s fast evolving demands in the Videoconferencing world. Manufacturers can offer the soft-MCU for on-premise deployment on company’s internal servers (usually preferred by enterprises) but the lower end of the group video conferencing market will also benefit from the hosted services (cloud services) offered by providers.

Current market of Software MCU solutions

Although still in relatively early phase in terms of adoption, the market is all but short in offering soft-MCUs solutions for multipoint Videoconferencing. Some of them offered as pure software to be installed on industry-standard servers, some of them require some sort of hardware usually from the same provider which makes them a kind of  “hybrid” solution. I will just go briefly through some of the most talked about products out there at the moment:

 Avistar

Avistar offers the Avistar C3 Conference, a software-based MCU that runs on standard off-the-shelf hardware and operating system software, and on virtualized servers. It is mainly designed for on-premise deployment in enterprise environments, but service providers offering managed Videoconferencing services could also take advantage from it.

Each conference server can support up to 12 ports of simultaneous conferencing, video standards supported are H.263 and H.264 up to 1024 kbps call rate per endpoint with 30 fps.

 Polycom

The Polycom RealPresence Collaboration Server 800s, Virtual Edition is a multi-protocol, integrated, software-based multipoint MCU running on x86 servers. Mainly designed for mid-sized enterprises or to expand an existing RealPresence Collaboration Server (RMX) environment, it provides open standards scalable video coding (SVC) support and interoperability with systems that use advanced video coding (AVC). It can support up to 40 H.263 or H.264 video ports with 720p and 30 fps.

 Vidyo

Vidyo solution consists of Vidyo Router at its center, offered also as a virtual edition (VE), which performs transcoding-free packet switching using their patented Adaptive Video Layering (AVL) technology which introduces low-latency video-streams for endpoints over any IP network. It can be deployed on industry standard servers and is “VMware Ready” certified. Interoperability with legacy systems requires the use of VidyoGateway. The VidyoRouter VE comes in two models – VE 100 and VE 25 offering 100 and 25 concurrent HD connections respectively, supporting native rate and resolution matching per endpoint, up to 1440p at 60fps. Vidyo technology is available through service providers such as Videoconference24.

 Pexip

Pexip is a new start-up that offers pure-software based MCU called Infinity, which will be available from September. It can be deployed on industry-standard servers in a VMware virtualized environment and port capacity can be easily scaled up by adding more servers. It will support H.263 and H.264, SVC, VP8 video codecs as well as interoperability with WebRTC and Lync. We are yet to see how this product will perform in the real-world but it definitely looks promising with of supporting wide range of software clients and endpoints.

Acano

Acano, Software, MCU, Soft-MCU, Tablet, BYOD, Notebook, Laptop, manage, videoconference, vc, video conference, telepresence

Acana Software MCU Example

Acano is also also a new player in the industry, offering software solution that unites “previously incompatible audio, video and web technologies” in “coSpaces” which are essentially cloud virtual meeting rooms. People can use whatever devices they have to call into a coSpace, including mobile phones, tablets, PCs, Microsoft Lync clients or video endpoints. Designed for the x86 architecture, it runs on their optimized hardware, standard servers, as well as in virtualized environments and can support thousands of users per server, with further scale and resilience provided by native clustering. Major video standards are supported including H.264 AVC, SVC, WebM / VP8, Microsoft RTVideo, and said to support H.265 as well.

 Vidtel

Vidtel is primarily a service provider; does not offer soft-MCU for on-premise enterprise deployment, but they do offer hosted cloud Videoconferencing solution, labeled MeetMe – it’s a cloud-based, “any-to-any” video conferencing service which supports interoperability between SIP, H.323, Google Talk, Skype, and WebRTC. It supports up to 20 video conferencing endpoints with 720p. The infrastructure for video conferencing is hosted on a Vidtel central cloud and each participant is given a private meeting room ID and a login PIN; they use this to join the Vidtel MeetMe meeting and start communicating and interacting almost as if they were in the same office.

 LifeSize

LifeSize UVC Multipoint is a software-MCU that can be installed on industry-standard servers. It supports H.263 and H.264, SVC video standards and interoperability with Lync (Microsoft RTVideo). Customers can purchase and scale one port at a time and administrators can selectively control the quality and capacity of each port, ranging from 360p for mobile users to 1080p for room-based environments (with the Enterprise edition) and maximum of 128 participants in a single conference.

 Cisco

Cisco became the undisputed king in Videoconferencing hardware, with the acquisition of Tandberg, but they do not offer software-MCU that can be deployed on-premise. They do however offer cloud Videoconferencing service called – Cisco WebEx Telepresence, which can support up to 12 participants per conference with 1080p. At the moment it’s only available in the U.S. and Canada.

 Blue Jeans Network

Blue Jeans – similar to Vidtel, Blue Jeans is a service provider offering hosted hosted video bridging with multi-vendor interoperability including Skype and Lync. Also they are the developers of their own solution and allow re-selling. It supports up to 25 participants per meeting with 720p at 30 fps  and offers easy web based management capabilities for administrators as well as reporting capabilities.

 Avaya / Radvision

Avaya / Radvision is offering the Elite 6000 Series – software-based hybrid multi-point control unit providing high port density up to 40 full 1080p HD ports (80 720p) on a single 1U system. All the major video standards are supported as well as interoperability with other vendors.

As we can see there are lots of different flavors and there are more solutions out there, opening new opportunities for those who could not own standalone MCU before. It’s hard to say what the future holds, certainly it’s too early to dismiss hardware-based MCUs in which companies have invested a lot of money. It’s clear that the two solutions will coexist for some time and it’s up to the customers to choose the best solution for their business based on their requirements in usage, cost and features.


Software MCU Example Video by Pexip

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dA2oh-4A8Qg&w=575]

iRobot Ava 500: Next-Gen Telepresence Roll-About

irobot, ava 500, ava, ava500, robots, telerobotics, robotics, remote control, cisco, ex60, telepresence, futuristic, enterprise, corporate, hallway,

Photo: iRobot

Telepresence robots are not only a sci-fi part of TV shows such as the “Shelbot” as seen in “The Big Bang Theory”. A new telepresence robot has been announced: iRobot mounts Cisco EX60 TelePresence units on their cutting edge, auto-moving robots and introduces the iRobot Ava 500.

iRobot Ava 500 Introduction

The iRobot Corporation is an U.S. based company founded in 1990 and one of the pioneers of telepresence robot technology. Their portfolio includes robots for domestic use as well as solutions for police and military forces. Now they have introduced the Ava 500 and moving into enterprises and manufacturing sector by enhancing the iRobot technology with the Cisco EX60 TelePresence unit for HD video conferencing features.

Ava 500 is not only able to be remotely moved, but can also move autonomously to a target location without the effort of actually steering the unit. This enables the users to use the scheduling function to make sure that the Ava 500 robot is in the desired position at a planned time and date. All information about its position and move can be tracked on an app via iPad or iPhone and does not require in-depth technical insight.

In order to be able to move autonomously Ava 500 will make an “exploration” run when placed in a building for the first time. The area will be scanned and all information will be recorded on its location map, which then can be used by the user easily to tap to a location using only the touch screen of the iPad or iPhone. POIs, such as conference rooms or employees workstations, can be placed on the map for easy access. Even though the user does not actively have to steer the unit, it will still be possible to view the camera feed of the moving Ava 500 and to say “hi” to co-workers passing by. After a session is complete, the Ava 500 unit will automatically move back to it’s docking station to charge up again.

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Photo: iRobot

Professional Video Conferencing

Having the Cisco EX60 TelePresence unit mounted, the video conferencing part of the robot can be maintained and managed by the VNOC (Video Network Operations Centre) just like any other Cisco TelePresence endpoint. Therefore maintaining full interoperability, security and ability to register the unit to Cisco TMS (TelePresence Management Suite) and the Cisco VCS (Video Communication Server) for easy management.

Quick Facts

  • Autonomous navigation in office buildings, laboratories, manufacturing floors, etc.
  • Remote control with iOS devices (iPad, iPhone)
  • Cisco EX60 with HD capability and auto-focus camera take care of the AV transmissions
  • Wireless connection on enterprise level with the Cisco Aironet 1600
  • Height adjustment to make sure you look your conversation partner in the eyes
  • Scheduling function makes sure the robot is in the meeting room when you need it to be
  • Release estimated in early 2014
  • Price not yet announced

Summary

The iRobot Ava 500 brings together high-tech robotics and cutting edge video conferencing technology in a futuristic looking device to assist corporate communications and collaboration on a new level without compromises to interoperability.

Thanks to Caitlin Kullberg of iRobot for helping me with the research and photo material. I’m looking forward to see one of these guys moving around in the future. How would you like using this robot on your “working-from-home” day or visiting a remote location with the ability to explore the campus? Let us know of your opinion in the comment section below.


iRobot Ava™ 500 Video Collaboration Robot

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVviDvsBQ78&w=575]

China Taking Video Conferencing One Step Further: TeleEducation from Space

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Photo: CMSE

We often hear about the use of video conferencing for professional communication and as a modern way to work together. So much sometimes, that we forget how large the potential is even beyond that. For instance it can be used for TeleEducation (a type of Telepresence).

What is TeleEducation?

TeleEducation usually replicates a guided way of learning wherein a presenter, expert or teacher speaks to the “class” from a remote location with the use of unified communication technologies such as video conferencing, often with additional content channel for demonstration and data presentation. LifeSize, for instance, is organising great virtual field trips for classes to be connected directly into museums, where their guide can teach them in a way that is exciting for both presenting party and participants.

Teachers from Outer-Space

China is taking this approach one step higher – above stratosphere to be exact. Yesterday we received word that Wang Yaping, in her capacity as  Taikonaut, has facilitated such an TeleEducation event from the space station Tiangong-1 together with her team. The space video conference was set up with an auditorium in Beijing, hosting more than 300 students. The three Taikonauts demonstrated the effect of zero gravity and weightlessness to physics and answered questions from the students live.

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Photo: CMSE

Mass-Audience

Another 60 million students followed the live video stream from their classrooms throughout the country. Now that’s a serious audience there! While this event was broadcasted on a state-owned CCTV technology, the next event like this might already be facilitated using IP video streaming solutions. If that was the case, the event could be natively recorded and stored on video-on-demand platforms to be seen by many generations of students to come.

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Photo: AP

About the Station

The Tiangong-1 space station was launched September 2011 and mainly has experimental functions and holds three crew members . It is considered a large step towards a Chinese space laboratory, to be completed by about 2020. Tiangong-1 (Chinese: 天宫一号) literally means “Heavenly Palace 1” and is the first space station deployed by the Chinese space program. The module 1 has a planned lifespan of 2 years and is planned to be replaced by larger modules throughout the decade. The Telepresence24.com team wishes best success and hopes for many more TeleEducation events.


Astronauts give science lesson live from space (via ITN)

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Po8q4rTRsOA&w=575]

Deutsche Telekom discontinues VideoMeet

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Source: Wikipedia

The cloud video conferencing solution VideoMeet by Deutsche Telekom in corporation with Blue Jeans Network is now confirmed to be discontinued by end of the year. The decision was first published by the German  expert magazine “Telecom Handel” in an online article yesterday by Waltraud Ritzer.

What is VideoMeet?

The solution was designed to bring different types of video conferencing devices and software clients together with Blue Jeans cloud technology. The VideoMeet solution was first introduced in June 2011 and has seen strong marketing campaigns. In addition to the virtual MCU and the interop between systems of many different vendors, Blue Jeans technology was first to natively bridge Skype participants into professional video conferences. In 2012 more compatibility features were announces such as the integration into Microsoft Lync or using the service directly out of the Browser with WebRTC.

What’s next?

Starting from January current users can switch to a new model by Deutsche Telekom, which is yet to be announced, or get the service directly from Blue Jeans. Spokesperson Marion Kessing says that unlike the cloud solution VideoMeet, Immersive Telepresence and other video conferencing options of Deutsche Telekom will be extended.

Next to the user base this also hits redistribution partners as they will have to find an alternative cloud video conferencing solution for their clients and integrate it into their service portfolio before January. Seeing the increasing demand for cloud video conferencing a complete removal of the service is unlikely.

Cloud video conferencing alternatives?

Users and redistributors alike might now be interested in alternatives such as examples that can be found on our recent cloud video conferencing solution comparison. In addition to that of course like always we would love to hear your opinion and the experiences you have made.

What is WebRTC? – Overview for Busy People

webrtc, logo, chat, bubble, shapes, colours, colorsNo other topic is roaming the news and social media as much as WebRTC these days. But what is WebRTC and what should it mean to you?

Today I would like to give you an overview around this trend and where it came from. In this article I would like to try out the “For Busy People” article format by consolidating all hot topics into quick facts to add value to you without getting side-tracked. I know you busy people are busy and so you can just skip the parts of the article that you are not interested in.

What does WebRTC stand for?

WebRTC means Web Real-Time Communication, so we are talking about ways to communicate without any delay, based on a web-browser, without the use of software that needs to be installed beforehand.

What is WebRTC?

WebRTC is an open framework for placing real-time communication components on web-pages and is controlled by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), who are also taking care of other web-standards such as HTML, XML, CSS and others. WebRTC components could include methods such as VoIP, Instant Messaging (or just “chat”), video conferencing or a combination of these. Personally I would count WebRTC to the umbrella of Unified Communications, but the actual use of the WebRTC solutions depend on each enterprise.

Where does WebRTC come from?

WebRTC technology was first developed by Global IP Solutions (or GIPS), a company founded around 1999 in Sweden. In 2011 GIPS was acquired by Google and the W3C started to work on a standard for WebRTC. Since then Google and other major players in the web-browser market, such as Mozilla and Opera, have been showing great support for WebRTC.

How does WebRTC work?

The framework is based on HTML5 and JavaScript but does not utilise SIP or H.323 like other Unified Communication solutions. The signalling and transfer of data works over RTP and with an XMPP extension called “Jingle”. With the newly introduced JavaScript Session Establishment Protocol (JSEP) direct connections can be established without the need of a piece of hardware in the middle. Depending on the deployment audio, video and / or other data can now be exchanged to allow WebRTC to happen in your browser.

And for our firewall traversal specialists: WebRTC can do STUN, ICE, TURN, RTP-over-TCP and supports proxies. What else do you wish for?

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How does WebRTC work? – Click for larger pop-up

What does WebRTC mean to me?

Imagine the impact of 1,000,000,000+ endpoints. Not bad! This is the potential amount of endpoints talking to each other and making VoIP calls or even video conferences. Even though Microsoft is strongly pushing Skype for desktop video conferencing, they are also making sure that their Internet Explorer is ready to take on the WebRTC challenge.

But the missing link right now is: Will there be interoperability between WebRTC and other Unified Communication solutions? I believe the first developers, making both worlds compatible to each other will have edge.

Examples for WebRTC?

The possibilities are impossible to count. Especially in the age of BYOD everyone has their smartphone always ready and beyond that every notebook and desktop PC could participate in WebRTC. Here are some examples I could think of:

  • Customer service via video conference (the end of the service hotline?)
  • Working together on documents via web (web-collaboration beyond firewalls)
  • Smart-TVs allow you do do video conferences without infrastructure or service running in the back (if there’s a browser – there’s a way!)
  • Not interested in video conferences? Have a video diary! (takes only cloud storage and WebRTC)
  • WebRTC might change the face of Social Media platforms like Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter completely if implemented (why not quickly talk about it?)
  • Instead of displaying phone numbers to your common window-shopper, provide a QR-code or a NFC space, so users can reach directly to you with their smartphone or tablet (we got a camera, a mic, a speaker – so let’s use them!)

Is there a WebRTC presentation?

You are lucky! Google has recently released a web-based presentation with a lot of interesting slides. I have also added a video below, for your to get some more details on WebRTC, Let me know of your thoughts!


Web Real-time communication – Google I/O 2013 – by Justin Uberti

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LifeSize Smart Video now on Desktop and Mobile Devices

LifeSize, Logitech, ClearSea, Mirial, Desktop, Video Conference, Videoconference, Unified Communications, iPad, iPhone, Smartphone, Tablet, Smart, Video, Telepresence, Call, Devices, UVC

Connect several devices with LifeSize Smart Video (Image by LifeSize)

Earlier today LifeSize, a division of Logitech, has introduced a change in their Smart Video portfolio. Smart Video is designed to simplify the video collaboration experience and usability. After they introduced their first Smart Video hardware endpoint solution, the Icon series, earlier this year, they are now revamping ClearSea to be part of the UVC platform.

ClearSea is a former Mirial solution that found a new home after Mirial was acquired by LifeSize. In the old days it required hardware infrastructure to run the product on licence base. Now LifeSize has turned the desktop, smartphone and tablet video solution into a part of their UVC platform, resulting in the service to be virtualised. This is a great addition to the more and more virtualised unified communications solution portfolio directly out of Austin, Texas.

Features

  • Unlimited amount of user accounts
  • Invite guests
  • Connect up to 5 devices with a single account
  • All logged in devices will receive an incoming video conference call
  • Smooth live transfer of calls between logged in devices
  • Add participants to a call
  • Synchronised and customisable directory
  • Full SIP and H.323 support

The UVC ClearSea solution will be available from today, starting at 1,199 USD MSRP. For more information please consult the datasheet, visit the LifeSize blog or go directly to the UVC ClearSea product page for a free 30-day trial.

About LifeSize

LifeSize is a pioneer and world leader in high-definition video collaboration. Designed to make video conferencing truly universal, our full range of open standards-based systems offer enterprise-class, IT-friendly technologies that enable genuine human interaction over any distance. Founded in 2003 and acquired by Logitech in 2009, LifeSize, with its commitment to relentless innovation, continues to extend the highest-quality video conferencing capabilities to anyone, anywhere. For more information, visit http://www.lifesize.com.


UVC ClearSea in Action
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