Tag Archives: Complexity

video conferencing Connect Two Boardroom 2_edited

The Elephant in the Video Conferencing Room

The fundamental challenge of running enterprise-wide video conferencing (VC) is keeping users happy. Happy users feel empowered, not foolish when confronted with the challenge of setting up or running a VC meeting. If you keep users happy you have most likely cut support costs while increasing utilisation – both metrics critical to any AV service manager come review time.

However for some inexplicable reason the VC industry as a whole has done a very poor job of keeping users happy. Regardless of what the respective vendor marketing departments say, most VC users consider the experience to be at best annoying, at worst completely off-putting. Integrators try to put lipstick on the vendor-grown pig, but inevitably only add cost and introduce unneeded complexity.

Are you being served?

Mike Horsley, CTO at VQ, throws some light on the self-service video trend among enterprise video conferencing users 

Our customers – among which are some of the largest enterprise users of video conferencing in the world – have traditionally been highly advanced users of the technology. They often approached us because the video service delivery solutions supplied as part of the manufacturers’ toolsets didn’t fully meet their needs.

These early adopters and visionaries knew what they really wanted in terms of management and reporting and we basically listened and built it, allowing us to exactly deliver the services they envisioned. They used our solution to deliver video conferencing that worked well and their users liked; adoption and usage-levels grew as a consequence.

Several generations of refinements later, we’re at the stage where users trust video and want more; the problem now is one of success. Delivering an exclusively managed service to a large user-base is not economically viable in the long term and the challenge is to enable that user-base to take control and serve themselves, whenever and wherever they need video – this is where a growing number of our bigger customers are heading.

Mike Horsley VQ Chief Technology Officer

Mike Horsley, CTO at VQ Communications

Several key pieces of the jigsaw have dropped into place in recent years that now enable self-service. One of these pieces is Microsoft Lync. Users like its simplicity and the fact that it looks and feels like they expect (click-to-call is a great example of this); the barriers to using it are suitably low, which encourages mass-adoption. Another part of the jigsaw is the infrastructure needed to host enterprise video and allow previously incompatible technologies – whether voice, audio or video – to work together. New entrants to this side of the market, and one I really like in this respect is Acano, solve the problems of making the slightly proprietary Lync work with traditional video equipment. This has been possible before but only just, and not without a great deal of hoops to jump through. Where Acano is different is that it makes the ‘joining the dots’ component of the problem significantly easier. For example, the Acano MCU automatically handles many of the differences between the various flavours of Lync – it just works. Acano also solves many of the scaling issues with traditional video conferencing MCUs, which have limited capacity and therefore the complexity of video conferencing was traditionally compounded by requiring lots of boxes. With the Acano MCUs, a single server can host many hundreds – if not thousands – of calls. So, essentially, anything can call anything and it scales like you wouldn’t believe. Technology like this makes huge self-service deployments viable for the first time.

Many customers are now exploring platforms that can deliver a traditional managed service but also allow them to introduce self-service. Managed video services will probably stay about where they are in use-level terms, but we are seeing a transition to planning and deployment of self-service systems; this is where we see the most future growth. Consider the voice conferencing model (people give out numbers and the participants dial-in to join the call). This is the model self-service video is moving to; users understand it and are already using it for conference calls.

To enterprises considering self-service I would highlight several factors that influence success and are worth considering. Firstly, video conferencing is inherently complex, whether managed- or self-service. It pushes your network harder than normal data and it will find all of the network issues you were blissfully ignorant to before. Technology solutions and partners will help make this easier but it is never truly easy (and don’t trust anyone who says it is). If you don’t have any experience, go to the experts first: video conferencing managed service providers. They have been through the pain before and having them on board will increase your chances of launching a service that works and meets your users’ expectations.

Not only is it not easy, it is also not a ‘quick fix’. Cutting corners predictably results in poor experience, low adoption and therefore higher overall costs due to low return on investment. Do it right and work with experts.

High levels of adoption massively reduce the cost-per-call-per-minute to the business so remember, just as with managed-service video, it is good user experience first and foremost that drives adoption. When developing a self-service solution, the focus must always be on guaranteeing reliability, usability and convenience.

Stay informed

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Have An Ultimate Experience With The LifeSize Icon Video Conferencing System

They are out: Check out the new LifeSize Icon series video conferencing endpoints!

Gone are those days, when business was concentrated at a single location. This era witnesses the spread out of business, globally. Many businesses have their bases in in numerous countries of the world or in many cities across a country, so it is not possible to monitor the production team or any other unit of a company by making a physical presence. This calls for the extensively emerging need of ‘video conferencing’, which makes it easier for the business heads to visit all the units or conduct meetings worldwide, and finally, enjoy supper with the family. Doesn’t it feel contended? Of course, it does!

 

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Like it or not! Video conferencing is on a fast transitional phase. Now, it is about the best quality to have best business meetings. Companies are looking out for systems that provide seamless experience, which is easy to use, efficient and budget friendly.

Bearing all the factors in mind, LifeSize has come up with a newly designed system – the Icon series. LifeSize, a division of Logitech, has introduced this system that not only eliminates the cost, but also renders a system that can be used on the go, as soon as the system is installed, without any substantial training.

Colin Buechler, CEO of LifeSize, motioned that the interface of this system is easy to handle, as it doesn’t have too many buttons, to make the system complex to handle. According to him, cost and the system complexity are the two major reasons for any company to be away from the adoption of a video conferencing system and LifeSize has taken care of these factors, while developing its system.

According to LifeSize, Icon Series can be deployed with LifeSize UVC applications that make video conferencing more efficient and flexible. When a video conference is a concern, there are two major factors that are taken into consideration—image and audio quality. So, here is certain in-depth information regarding these two qualities:

High Definition Image

LifeSize cameras provide high definition image, with a wide angle of 70 degrees. The camera lens is empowered by up to 10x optical zoom. The camera supports the highest video performance available and delivers flawless 1080p60 for ultimate clarity and fluid motion.

High Definition Audio

High definition image doesn’t suffice the need of an efficient video conference, it requires having an echo free audio too. The built LifeSize Digital MicPod in the Icon series systems delivers a great feel of Telepresence , as it has an omnidirectional microphone with strong audio processing and delivering capability. Also, if you want to have a standalone environment, you can soon integrate LifeSize touch-screen phone into the system.

Now how much is that?

What are you waiting for? LifeSize Icon series has already arrived and is available at a starting price of 2,999 USD (depending on your region and selected features). Check out their homepage for more information and request a demo!


The LifeSize Icon Series Commercial

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H.265 – New video codec using half the bandwidth coming soon

How does H.265 work? When will H.265 come?

The news of a new codec coming has been going around for the last weeks now. But what does it really mean and how will it change the business?  Well let’s start at where this is coming from and how the history of H.265 actually looks like at the table below.

Release ITU ID MPEG Label ISO Number
 1988  H.261  MPEG-1 Video  11172-2
 1994  H.262  MPEG-2 Video  13818-2
 1996  H.263  MPEG-4 Part 2 ASP  14496-2
 2003  H.264  MPEG-4 Part 10 AVC  14496-10

Throughout the development of these codecs it was always the target to keep the quality of a video signal and to reduce their data size by applying intelligent algorithms. The complexity of these algorithms has increased and H.265 will have the most complex rules of codecs developed so far.

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Source: Wikinoticia.com

What is the main benefit of H.265?

H.265 will provide equal H.264 video quality but will reduce the required bandwidth for video conferencing or immersive telepresence by around 50% (more or less – depending on content in the video signal). This means that there could be twice as much video conferences going on simultaneously in a corporate network at the same quality. For all those who have been limited to a low bandwidth for video conferencing so far it can also mean that you can finally migrate to use HD video resolution and audio as clear as it has been never before.

When is H.265 coming?

There are no clear dates written in stone but so far H.265 is expected to be build into devices in 2013 and is expected to be a new standard in 2014.

What needs to be done to be ready for H.265?

More complex codecs usually require more computing power than the ones that were used previously. So in order to deliver the same quality at less data bandwidth it is very likely that also new hardware will be needed to use H.265. As for now the major video conferencing system producers have not announced a new series of H.265 endpoints but we will keep you posted.


Snorre Kjesbu and Thomas Wyatt of Cisco demonstrate H.265 at the Cisco Collaboration Summit

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