Tag Archives: disaster recovery

How A Disaster Recovery Strategy Prepares For The Worst

Data Center

Data Center (Photo credit: bandarji)

Typically, a company includes a list of potential risks when drafting a disaster recovery plan. After identifying these risks, the next step is to assess the damage that could be associated with those risks. This is one of the more difficult portions of disaster recovery planning. This is simply because businesses cannot accurately assess the damage associated with particular risks. It is recommended that companies use a disaster recovery service, rather than attempt in-house recovery, for that very reason.

Why Disaster Recovery? Why Assess the Damage?

A lot of companies skip the step of assessing the potential damage for disaster recovery risks. Though it may seem grim, assessing what damage a risk can create is crucial to be prepared for an event. When a disaster recovery plan does not have protocols for handling a particular risk or threat, a business cannot recover effectively.

One Cause, Multiple Effects

Businesses should realize that all risks will have more than one effect. For example, if a building suffers from a fire there will be multiple effects associated with that fire. Therefore, each risk assessed should have its multiple effects listed in the disaster recovery plan. Then a protocol should be created for handling them. Using the fire example, consider the following:

Structural Damage

The building will ultimately have structural damage. In some instances, the entire building will be destroyed and all of the contents gone with it. The disaster recovery plan would need to devise a backup location to house the workforce. In addition, protocols need to address how to handle the hardware, furniture and other interior items that are damaged.

Disruption of Power

When a fire breaks out, power will be cut off. In this situation, the company’s servers and networks can lose essential power to function. Therefore, the disaster recovery plan should implement a protocol for backup power supply or a backup storage location.

Inability to Work

When there is no physical location to report to, where will employees go? Disaster recovery plans need to account for the employee factor. Employees should have a backup office location or work-from-home plan if disaster incapacitates the company’s physical location. Data centres are a good solution for this problem.

Telecommunications Failure

A disaster would most likely wipe out all telecommunications. The business cannot contact employees, clients or even vendors from its office location. Therefore, the plan should implement a procedure for how to handle the telecommunications failure, such as a backup location.

Data Systems Destroyed

Fires will destroy data systems quickly. The disaster recovery plan should have a backup data centre or storage location where critical system information will be stored. It should be able to be easily accessed for quick recovery.

When a business creates a thorough disaster recovery plan, the chances of it staying out of commission are relatively low. In order to create an accurate plan, the business needs to honestly assess its risks. It also must honestly assess the impact those risks will have on its ability to operate. From there, a plan on how to act when disaster strikes and how to counteract the effects of that disaster can be drafted. This plan will be the difference between being closed for a short time and being closed for good.

Can Your Business Benefit From Cloud Computing?

cloud, computing, benefits, icon, business

Simply put, cloud computing is computing based on the Internet. So, instead of running programs or applications on a physical server, cloud computing allows you to access the same apps and software online, without needing to download or install them. Web applications, including but not limited to email, document sharing, instant messaging and more, are all designed to make it easier to collaborate and get work done no matter where you’re located.

From reducing costs to improving communication and collaboration to enhancing productivity, the benefits of cloud computing are countless.  Because of this, it’s important to understand the benefits of cloud computing and just why so many businesses are moving to the cloud.

 1. Reduced costs

Moving to the cloud will not only help you reduce costs on infrastructure and software but you’ll also be able to invest more money back into your business in research, marketing strategies, product innovation and anything else you need. Using the cost savings from cloud computing to free up resources will give your business a strong competitive advantage in the market.

With cloud, you only need to pay a small amount of money in return for a huge amount of storage space. Plus, cloud resources are easily scalable which means they can be altered to suit your exact needs as your business grows.

2. Disaster recovery

Did you know that 800,000 laptops are lost each year in airports alone? Although replacing the laptop may be costly, what do you do about everything you have saved on it? When you have everything stored in the cloud, you no longer have to worry about losing or not being able to access your data because it’s all in the cloud, safe and sound.

If you’re a business owner, cloud-based services will also help you solve issues faster in the event of a disaster. In fact, a recent survey conducted by the Aberdeen Group revealed mid-size businesses took almost half the time it took larger companies to recover after a disaster because of their commitment to the cloud. Furthermore, cloud-based disaster recovery services were able to get companies up and running again in 2.1 hours, compared to eight hours for those not using the cloud.

3. Automatic software updates

Using the cloud means you’ll no longer have to worry about purchasing, installing, downloading and updating software. Cloud computing suppliers take care of this for you – security updates included – thus freeing up your time so you can focus on other important aspects of your business.

Not only does this save you hassle, but it also means you don’t have to worry about hackers exploiting out of date software.

4. Increased collaboration

Cloud computing makes collaboration easy as all employees – no matter where they’re located – can access and work on shared documents at the same time and don’t need to keep sending them back and forth over email. This is a huge benefit of cloud computing as all files are stored in a central location which means employees can talk to each other while making changes to the central copy at the same time. The collaboration is simplified and it translates to business efficiency as no time is wasted on uploading and emailing files and waiting for updates.

5. Work from anywhere using the cloud

You can have employees working from anywhere in the world, so long as they have an Internet connection. In addition, the cloud has also become more accessible via smartphones and tablets, which means that you really can have access to your documents anytime and anywhere.

As you can see, the reduced costs, the flexibility and security provided by cloud computing can truly give a business leeway to focus in its core priorities.

Can you think of any other fantastic benefits of using cloud computing? Go ahead and share them with us in a comment below.