Tag Archives: Environment

Mobile Unified Communications: The Solution to Enterprise Success

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Photo by Victor1558 via Flickr

In the communications industry, smartphones have evolved into an invaluable device that blurs the line between business and personal processes. Many of the features necessary on these gadgets elevated the status of these devices from merely a trend to an inexpensive ubiquity. With SMS functions, e-mail connectivity, internet browsing, and voice over the internet protocol applications; smart handsets are now key examples of how mobile unified communications translate to a more successful enterprise.

Unified Communications in the Mobile Age

The concept is no longer an innovation or a ground-breaking thought. A 2011 research by Information Week stated that almost 36% of enterprises have been implementing unified communication systems. Back then, almost one in five business technology experts said that deployments of unified communication strategies are under-way. O2 conducted a similar study this year, which showed that 88% of senior IT leaders said that a consolidation of their data, voice, and mobile networks will occur in the next two years. Unified communication is the perfect contingency plan.

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Photo by Saad Faruque via Flickr

There seems to be one reason why so many deem this enterprise concept as a standard. As  ‘smart’ technologies grew in number, innovations related to the communication realm are both inevitable and optimal. The industry enjoys the continually improving technology of VoIP and live video, which equates to web conferencing being the norm on many enterprises. Instant messaging and social networking has largely affected the business way of thinking.

Unified messaging is a concept that allows a single space to become the gate to many different communication portals. All of these technologies are made simple, portable, and hassle-free mobile technologies – smartphones, tablets, and everything in between.

Vital Role in a Business’s Success

Its aim is to address the many common errors committed through traditional business communication models. These communication problems often stem from misunderstandings, Chron said. More often than not, these misunderstandings come from the vagueness of language. Either way, digital unified communication strategies are employed to lessen the risk of these crucial flaws.

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Photo by ffaalumni via Flickr

A well-planned strategy, zeroing on the mobile platform, can prove to be beneficial to many enterprises through the following advantages:

  •  Maximize productivity – It allows a better exchange between managers and workers, minimizing time wasted through unnecessary back and forth e-mails or calls. Working at home is now a possibility that is open to most desk jobs that previously required office spaces and devices.
  • Minimize costs – It is admittedly not the least expensive resource out there, but it is definitely a guaranteed investment that pays off over time. Also, the initial cost may be reduced depending on the current tech and communication infrastructure of the company and thus, can be modified for cheaper solutions. Additionally, the cost of travel can be minimized (or even totally eliminated) through many features of UC. 

Social Media and Unified Communication

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Photo by SalFalko via Flickr

Social media has undergone many advances in its field that is largely due to unified communications. For example, the increase in popularity of social networking site LinkedIn tells us that there is more to social media than ‘liking pages’ and ‘becoming a fan’. This interestingly blurring of professional and personal realms is credited to UC concepts such as network cultivation through contacts. Mark Straton, senior VP of Marketing, Voice and App Solutions of Siemens Enterprise Communications Group, echoed this sentiment. “Social media tools have rapidly moved from being the preferred communication method of millennials,” Straton said.

The main goal of UC is to reduce what is called communication latency. Thus it’s touted better than the multitude of avenues by which we communicate as people, workers, or businesses. This has been adapted extremely well in the most recent phases of social media through sharing of Tweets and automatic posting on Facebook’s wall from many other places like Flickr, Instagram or Ask.Fm.

Summary

It is no surprise that the enterprise unified communication market is rising. In this age of mobile usage, businesses acknowledge the necessity of an equally mobile enterprise to increase yield without much wasting of resources.

Introduction to Session Border Controllers

High definition video conferencing is a standard right now. If it will change, it will only change to an ever higher definition such as Ultra HD (involving 4K and 8K). Virtual workplaces, telecommuting and working from home becomes more and more easy and so organisations go expanding, sometimes forgetting about network requirements ending up with new capacity limits or reduced quality of their video communication solution.

A Session Border Controller can help with many problems there might be, but it is not a remedy for every issue ever to occur on your video conferencing network. I wrote this article to give you some more insight into what a Session Border Controller is, what it does and how it can help your corporate communication.

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Click for large version

What is a Session Border Controller?

A Session Border Controller is a network component designed to safely link networks with a different security requirement and setup. They are mostly utilised for VoIP and video conferencing networks to establish secure connection sessions. The Session Border Controller therefore allows control of signaling and transfer of media data in a secure way.

What can I do with a Session Border Controller?

Session management allows service providers to control the session routing, establish interoperability across environments with differentiating standards, enforce bandwidth policies or create an interface to a third party application. To keep it short and simple: A Session Border Controller optimizes solution performance and overall service quality, it allows a rapid service deployment or growth and it protects infrastructure from malicious attacks.

Who develops Session Border Controllers?

Based on Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Session Border Controllers from October 2012, Acme Packet (recently acquired by Oracle) excels in execution as well as vision scope, making them the leader of the magic quadrant (see graphic). Other competitors are Huawei, Sonus, Genband, Metaswitch Networks, Dialogic, ZTE and Technicolor.

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Magic Quadrant for Session Border Controllers by Gartner Research

Acme Packet is very interesting due to their focus on unified communications networks and even offering solutions especially designed for video conference networks of manufacturers such as Alcatel-Lucent, Avaya / Radvision, Cisco (including former Codian / Tandberg technologies), LifeSize, Polycom and Vidyo. Supporting and enabling interworking these technologies the Acme Packet solution avoids potential for vendor lock-in, protecting the investment made in video conferencing infrastructure and endpoints.

What are the technical functions of a Session Border Controller?

The functional scope of a Session Border Controller can vary, depending on what the individual device is designed to do. However to reflect a maximum of capability information, we would like to list the following functions that can be found in Session Border Controllers:

Connectivity

  • IPv4 / IPv6 interworking
  • SIP manipulation
  • NAT traversal
  • VPN connectivity
  • H.323 / SIP interworking

Quality of Service (QoS)

  • Traffic policies
  • Call admission control
  • ToS / DSCP bit setting
  • Resource allocation
  • Rate limiting

Security

  • Defense against DoS attacks
  • Can prevent toll fraud
  • No topology hiding possible
  • Malformed packet protection
  • Signaling protection via TLS and IPSec
  • Media protection via SRTP

Media processing

  • DTMF delay and interworking
  • Media transcoding
  • Tones and announcements
  • Data and Fax interworking
  • Support for Voice and Video calls

Regulatory

  • Call prioritization (e.g. for VIP usage or emergencies)
  • Auditing functions for internal audit or for law enforcing organisation
  • Business Intelligence, reporting, management information, source for billing information

Summary

Even though not a mandatory part for VoIP or video conferencing networks, Session Border Controllers have a great potential to add value to the communication services of organisations. The relevance increases for service providers companies as the functions described above can significantly increase the quality and performance of a serviced network.

If you have questions, remarks or other types of feedback please drop us a line in the comment section below. Thank you!

How Video Conferencing Technology Can And Is Changing Marketing On The Internet

Video conferencing, once the domain of larger organizations with bigger budgets, has come down in price dramatically during the last decade and a half. At the same time, not only its quality but also its versatility and portability have increased exponentially. The end result (at least up to now) of these trends has been a dramatic explosion in how many people use video calling and the ways in which they do so.

Aside from the many coordination and communication benefits that have stemmed from the video calling revolution, another major bonus has also been discovered in the myriad ways by which this rapidly advancing technology can be used to serve as a marketing and promotional tool for not only large companies but also smaller business and even individuals following their own business or professional goals.

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Pitching via Video Conference (photo: gcbb)

From personalizing customer relations in an effort to draw in more sales to using video calling for online sales pitches and demonstrations of products or services, video conferencing has become a powerful marketing tool that carries its own unique position in the online promotion landscape.

Here’s a look at some of the major innovations found in using video conference call technology when marketing to clients, buyers and anyone else.

More Face-to-Face Client / Seller Relations

The first and most obvious marketing innovation of video calling is the ability it has given marketers to engage their clients and buyers in face-to-face consultations or Q&A periods.

If someone is running a service or product business on the web, making sure to highlight the fact that their customers can interact with real people in real-time over any questions, doubts or issues they might have before or after buying is a big selling point to many potential clients, especially if their previous experience with customer service in a particular niche involves being ignored or unable to reach some solid customer support.

Whether you’re selling a product or a service, if you really want to enhance your customers experience and decision-making into something that’s memorable, be sure to do exactly this and underscore it in your marketing materials now that video conferencing offers you the ability to schedule actual life Q&A sessions with multiple people over interactive video media.

Interactive Long Distance Pitches

The long-used art of pitching a product, service or idea to potential buyers during a face-to-face meeting is a tried and true marketing tactic that numerous business owners use worldwide. With video conferencing, this very same strategy can reach into the digital world by allowing a marketer to lure clients or potential buyers toward a one on one consultation which is then in essence used as a sort of digital pitch that tries to create a purchase through interactive salesmanship.

Although this tactic might have some implementation difficulties that stem from problems with getting people to actually sit down for the sales meeting, if you’ve already built strong interest in your leads through a sales funnel and have motivated them with some sort of freebie into actually listening to your video call, you could really create a door-to-door sales level of interaction with a completely digital and much more targeted audience. Video call based pitching would be especially effective for high priced products or services that offset time costs even if your eventual sales closing numbers are low.

 Online Seminars through Video Conferencing

This is a really major and still largely unexplored region of the online marketing landscape that could benefit immensely from video conferencing. While physical sales seminars are a common thing in just about every hotel conference room you’ve ever passed through, and online video “webinars” where you can listen in but not participate are already completely established as part of online marketing strategy, a major and still very undeveloped leap would involve joining the two into a completely digital, massive video conference style seminar with full interactivity.

Thanks to the rapidly developing technology of video conferencing, the attendees can interact with the sales presenter just like they would be able to if they had physically gone to a real sales conference while enjoying the convenience of joining in from home as people do with classical online marketing webinars. On top of that there are many consumption based video conferencing software solutions that allow the use of the technology even with a smaller budget.

The marketing benefits this can potentially offer your business are considerable. For one thing, you as a marketer would save on the high costs of arranging for a sales seminar in an actual location where you’ll have to pay rent and present printed promotional materials. And furthermore, you could duplicate everything available at live sales seminars in an online environment while still being able to take questions and speak to leads in real-time. A somewhat heavier telepresence software bundle would be needed to pull off this kind of online marketing maneuver, but the potential benefit could be completely worthwhile.

IPv6 and its Impact on Videoconferencing

I’m sure most of the people working with technology are familiar with the terms IPv4 and IPv6. In a nutshell – every device connected on a network (Internet or private network) requires an IP address in order to “communicate” to other devices. The current standard for these addresses is called IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4), and it forms the foundation of most Internet communication today. IPv4 however suffers from several important shortfalls, most importantly the lack of sufficient address space. For that reason, IPv6 was developed which introduces a number of other improvements especially to QoS (Quality of Service) and Security.

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Visualisation on how we are running out of IPv4 addresses (Photo: Abode of Chaos)

In order to utilize a device for a video conference, regardless whether it is a high end video codec or a smartphone, that device needs to be connected to a network, so naturally it will require an IP address. Without going in too much technical details, but still mentioning the most important terms,  let’s see how IPv6 features will affect video communication.

Huge address space

The most important benefit of IPv6 implementations is that it will provide virtually unlimited address space, by introducing 128-bit address, versus the 32-bit address used by IPv4. Just as an analogy, it will be enough to assign IPv6 address to every atom on the earth and still have enough left to do another 100+ earths. This will allow virtually any device in future to be assigned a globally reachable address, which in turn means that NAT (Network Address Translation) will be no longer necessary in the long term, and removing NAT from the equation will solve a lot of the interoperability issues in real-time services such as VoIP and Videoconferencing. It will also be possible to assign multiple network  addresses to devices which means they can stay connected to several different networks at the same time.

Improved Quality of Service (QoS)

Quality of Service refers to the ability of the network to prioritize certain traffic to other and is especially important to VoIP (Voice over IP) and Video Communication, since we don’t want to have any delay here. The way data is transmitted in today’s IP networks is in form of network packets. These packets consist of two parts: packet header – containing control information, and payload – containing the used data. IPv6 improves over IPv4 in terms of QoS is by introducing new field in the packet header called “Flow Label”. This  “label” is used to identify and prioritize certain packet flow, for eg. video stream and allows devices on the same path (routers, switches…) to read the flow label and take appropriate action based on it.

Plug-and-Play support

With IPv6, addresses can be assigned automatically and dynamically by the client device, by getting the network prefix from any router it finds and then generate the full IP address for that network, based on the hardware MAC address. This means there will be no need for DHCP servers like with IPv4, and also less configuration requirements.  DHCPv6 will of course still be available for assigning IPv6 addresses.

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Example of how IPv4 and IPv6 can look (by webopedia.com)

Improved Security

IPv6 will provide better security than IPv4 when it comes to authentication and encryption of the transmitted data. The main reason for that is IPsec – a security protocol that is mandatory for IPv6 systems, and only optional for IPv4 environments. IPsec is defined as a set of security standards, originally written as part of the IPv6 specifications, and allows data to be secured from the originating to the destination host (through the various network elements such as routers, gateways…) by maintaining data confidentiality, integrity and authentication at the network layer. Another security improvement comes from the fact that IPv6 subnets will be so large so any attempt for hackers to scan them searching for a specific host will be ineffective.

Improved Mobility

Mobility refers to the ability of a device to move between different IP networks and still maintain the same IP address. This is very important for IP enabled real-time communication services, no one wants to be disconnected from a call while moving from one physical location to another. For that purpose, the Mobile IP protocol was designed by IETF. This protocol was further enhanced with Mobile IPv6 and Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 (HMIPv6) which propose higher level of security and more efficient data transmitting.

Big packets and improved routing

Another benefit to visual communications is IPv6 support for very big packet payloads, up to 4 billion bytes (IPv4 supports up to 65535 bytes only). With bandwidth becoming cheaper and the increase in device processing power, supporting big packets delivery  will be important when dealing with high quality multimedia content of the future. Even though the packet can be a lot bigger than in IPv4 systems, the actual routing of the information is improved due to the simplified packet header and structured approach to addressing, which reduces the amount of information network routers must store and leads to faster packet forwarding.

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When should we implement IPv6 and with what approach? (Photo: ºNit Soto)

Migration considerations

When talking about IPv6 impact on the network, it is very important to consider the  migration strategy as well, from Ipv4 to IPv6. Basically there are three ways to manage this: dual-stack implementation where all the network components and devices support both IPv4 and IPv6, tunneling – is implementation method where IPv4 packets get encapsulated and transported over IPv6 network backbone, and proxy translation – where network border element performs the mapping of packets from one IP version to another.

Outlook

Most likely, providers and businesses will opt to upgrade the existing network infrastructure to dual stack in order to support both customers. Some network elements that do not support dual-stack mode will have to be upgraded or replaced and new infrastructure that will be deployed will have to support IPv6 dual stack from the beginning.

Each migration strategy will definitely introduce certain level of latency in the network, so that is just a reason more that all services must be properly tested before a production rollout.

What is “the Cloud”? And what is it not?

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Clouds on summer sky (Photo: fastjel)

The Cloud – One of the hottest buzzwords and most abused in describing products or services recently. In this article I would like to mix facts with personal experiences I made, in order to assist everyone, who would like to find out what the cloud is and does and the things that is does not do (hence the title). Cloud has been buzzing around for a while now but when I witnessed both my parents talking about “the cloud” and how they use it in private I understood that this technology has arrived in mainstream and it is here for good.

Cloud??

So what is the cloud in few words? The cloud, or cloud computing is a technology design to enable users working with solutions independent from device, location and network. Of course there are specialisations with a larger or smaller focus on one or two subjects but in general this is it.

Origin of the Term

There are many theories on the origin of the term, yet there is no proven story. Feel free to check some good options on the Wikipedia article for cloud computing. My theory is that it developed from the use of cloud clip-arts and stencils in technical drawings or presentations, created to visualise a network setup. I am sure that even before the term became a buzzword, most of you have seen presentations with little black boxes, switches and routers in and around a large cloud to set a virtual border between realms.

Is the Cloud something new?

I am afraid it is not. The ideas and designs for such concepts have already been around since the 1950s but like with many breakthroughs in the user world, it required certain cultural and technological thresholds to be reached before the adoption could take place on wide-scale.

What is the Cloud?

  • Agility – The cloud is agile and therefore allows users to upscale or downscale their service based on business demand. Further the actual hardware, used to host a virtual machine, can be re-purposed if necessary. This is however not a cloud-only benefit, please read further down on infrastructure virtualisation.
  • Availability – Services have the technological possibility of being available independent from devices, network and location. This is of course relative to the design of each service along with its purpose but technically this is no limitation. For instance you can use cloud video conferencing services to join any enterprise-grade video conference call from your smartphone, notebook, office workstation, tablet or even from a private computer at your home or maybe somewhere else. Of course your conference partner needs to have their own environment set up to accept connections from outside in general. Cloud technology is not a wall-breaker and cannot bypass security of an organisation, if they don’t allow such connections by policy.
  • Business Continuity – Cloud services are set up with redundancy and failover automation in place. So that even if single devices would fail, users would not notice and can proceed using the service. Such reliability would traditionally cost a lot of money when investing in owned or dedicated infrastructure black-boxes.
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Asus product presentation event of cloud-enabled tablet device with Windows 8 (Photo: Tecdencias)

What is the Cloud NOT?

  • Cloud = VirtualisationVirtualisation of infrastructure is a great way of deploying new solutions and upgrading your environment. But if you do this within your WAN this does not automatically mean you are using the “cloud”. You are just virtualising your infrastructure. Fair and square.
  • “No more hardware” – Well that’s a lie. Using software solutions or virtual infrastructure there will still always be servers and databases that require a physical body. Only the deployment and usage is changed but there will always be hardware. You might not own the hardware and you will most likely never see or touch it but it’s there, somewhere in a physical data centre.
  • Grid computing – No, grid computing is not the same as cloud computing in my opinion. Even though, it might be its scientific opposite. Where grid computing allows many computing units to work on a common target (e.g. movie rendering in render farms or Bitcoin mining), cloud computing allows a single user to utilise just any infrastructure in the pool offered by the cloud service provider to achieve their objective.
  • “Private Cloud” needs to be on-premises – No that’s not correct even though it seems to be a common assumption. A cloud service can be deployed dedicated for your organisation without anyone else having access to it, but the location of the physical hardware is irrelevant in order to provide that. In most cases the service provider will utilise hardware that is physically near to the user base in order to avoid performance issues that could occur on long “open internet” routes.

Challenges of Cloud Technology

  • Security – Any cloud service can be set up in secure manner if the solution and the environment of the clients allow it.
  • Privacy – Yes, privacy is a hot topic nowadays. But actually, it always were even in pre-internet age. Privacy is nothing impossible even in the cloud, even in the internet if you choose the right service provider. And if you are looking for good providers but affordability is a concern, make sure that your selected partner has a few good reference clients to show-case to you.
  • Compliance – When you are in phase 2 of the provider selection, bring in the techies of your organisation to make sure all offered functions and features are compliant to any active IT security policies that you need to consider.
  • Vendor Strategy – Cloud providers equal single vendor lock-in? Yes, it can be the case but if you want to avoid that, talk about this particular subject with your provider candidates. A few providers out there have established alliances and offer support to avoid any lock-ins.
  • Online works, offline it doesn’t – Depending on what your solution looks like make sure that your workforce  can use the solution when they are online and when they are offline. For instance when changing a file being on a flight, the data should update and synchronise itself in the cloud again when they are online. However there are some services which this does not apply to such as real-time communication (e.g. WebRTC, video conferencing, VoIP telephony, instant messaging).

Examples of Public Cloud Solutions

Summary

I hope this cleared some confusion around cloud terminology and technology. Further I hope it helped you through your process of picking a good service provider for your organisation if that was your objective. Further I would like to thank Simon Dudley of LifeSize and Phil Karcher of Forrester Research for hosting the webinar, which sparked the inspiration to write this article. LifeSize is often arranging interesting webinars and announces them on their social media platforms. Maybe I will see you on their next event – until then.

Have anything to add or feel I got the wrong picture? You are welcome to comment below and join the discussion. We at Telepresence24.com love your feedback!

How to become a Videoconferencing Expert

I will start this article by answering what exactly is an expert – to me it’s a person who is really really good at something. Simple as that. This post is only about my thoughts on what it takes for a person to become such, not how he uses his expertise.

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There is more to becoming an expert than this.

I agree with the assumption that all humans are born as “tabula rasa” (lat. blank state), meaning all their knowledge comes from learning, experience and perception, but with genetics playing significant role in the process. Unfortunately, not all people take advantage of the amazing opportunities that lie ahead of them in becoming really good in something they love doing, often due to fear of failure. But failure is not something to be feared of, on the contrary, as Thomas Edison said:

“I have not failed, I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”

Every person can be good at anything, good in so many things at the same time. But becoming really good at anything isn’t just a walk in the park. It takes discipline, focus and more importantly a strong will to make it happen.

So how does one become expert at anything? Well, I believe the formula is pretty much the same for any skill you choose. Since this is a Unified Communications blog and it happens to be the field that I’m currently working in, I’m going to point out what I consider to be important in becoming a Videoconferencing Expert.

Videoconferencing Education

I believe education is the first step in becoming good at something. Once you identify your objective and set your goals, you have to start preparing for reaching that goal, show genuine interest in learning all the bits and pieces that are related to what you really want to do, in this case Video Conferencing. I’m talking about harvesting knowledge you can use from every source you can get your hands on: specialized courses , forums, blogs, whitepapers, industry reports, product guides…

When it comes to official training, major industry leaders like Cisco and Polycom are already offering specialized training programs for anyone interested in becoming engineering or sales expert in Videoconferencing / Unified Communications and these certifications are usually valid for 2-3 years in order to keep up with the latest trends in the industry.

Cisco recently added two new programs to their certification portfolio focusing on Video, which already included the Cisco TelePresence Solutions Specialist and Cisco Rich Media Communications Specialist:

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CCNA Logo by Cisco

  • CCNA Video establishes an individual’s ability to deploy video endpoints, set up new users, and operate networked voice and video solutions for job duties that include configuring voice and video single-screen endpoint devices, supporting telephony and video applications, and troubleshooting. The certification also validates a candidate’s knowledge of the architecture, components, functionalities and features of Cisco Unified Communications Manager solutions.
  • Cisco Video Network Specialist establishes and enhances key skills including the ability to configure video single-screen endpoints, set up new user accounts, support video applications and troubleshoot networked video solutions.
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Polycom Logo

Polycom is offering the Polycom Certified Videoconferencing Engineer – a program that confirms the successful candidate has the necessary knowledge to perform implementation, configuration and troubleshooting operations for small to medium-sized environments on the Polycom RealPresence Platform including. In addition, the PCVE exam will validate the individual’s knowledge of networking models, standards and protocols relevant to videoconferencing.

Plenty of free training material is also available on the Internet. Personally, I liked the old Tandberg Certified Expert Partner (TCPE) program, simple and straight to the point, it’s perfect to gain the necessary technical knowledge when it comes to Video Communication.

Forums such as the VTCtalk and the Cisco Support Community are a great place for promoting and  sharing knowledge and engage other experts in constructive conversations about topics of the Videoconferencing / Unified Communications industry. There are also great groups on videoconferencing business and technology available on LinkedIn for anyone to join and listen or contribute.

Working Experience

It has been said many times before – no amount of theoretical knowledge compares to a real world experience, no matter what field are you part of. If you’re just starting in the industry, try an entry-level position and work your way from the bottom up. There are also companies who first offer training to their personnel for couple of months, and then make hiring decision, this is another good way of getting practical work experience.

And once you get there, try to learn as much as possible, try to learn everything you can about the topic, focus on becoming better and better until you become “so good they can’t ignore you”.

The constant hunger for knowledge is what separates experts from…well, everyone else. The beauty when working with technology is that it changes constantly, there is always something new to digest. Personally, I don’t understand how some people are pretty content with doing the same thing day by day. There is much more you can do, if you want to. The internet is there, the books are written and there are heaps of people to talk to, who are more than happy to engage in discussions – so jump right into it and become an expert!

I am going to end this post with two quotes from people who were really good at something and accomplished a lot:

“Action is the foundational key to all success.” – Pablo Picasso

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” – Benjamin Franklin

How A Disaster Recovery Strategy Prepares For The Worst

Data Center

Data Center (Photo credit: bandarji)

Typically, a company includes a list of potential risks when drafting a disaster recovery plan. After identifying these risks, the next step is to assess the damage that could be associated with those risks. This is one of the more difficult portions of disaster recovery planning. This is simply because businesses cannot accurately assess the damage associated with particular risks. It is recommended that companies use a disaster recovery service, rather than attempt in-house recovery, for that very reason.

Why Disaster Recovery? Why Assess the Damage?

A lot of companies skip the step of assessing the potential damage for disaster recovery risks. Though it may seem grim, assessing what damage a risk can create is crucial to be prepared for an event. When a disaster recovery plan does not have protocols for handling a particular risk or threat, a business cannot recover effectively.

One Cause, Multiple Effects

Businesses should realize that all risks will have more than one effect. For example, if a building suffers from a fire there will be multiple effects associated with that fire. Therefore, each risk assessed should have its multiple effects listed in the disaster recovery plan. Then a protocol should be created for handling them. Using the fire example, consider the following:

Structural Damage

The building will ultimately have structural damage. In some instances, the entire building will be destroyed and all of the contents gone with it. The disaster recovery plan would need to devise a backup location to house the workforce. In addition, protocols need to address how to handle the hardware, furniture and other interior items that are damaged.

Disruption of Power

When a fire breaks out, power will be cut off. In this situation, the company’s servers and networks can lose essential power to function. Therefore, the disaster recovery plan should implement a protocol for backup power supply or a backup storage location.

Inability to Work

When there is no physical location to report to, where will employees go? Disaster recovery plans need to account for the employee factor. Employees should have a backup office location or work-from-home plan if disaster incapacitates the company’s physical location. Data centres are a good solution for this problem.

Telecommunications Failure

A disaster would most likely wipe out all telecommunications. The business cannot contact employees, clients or even vendors from its office location. Therefore, the plan should implement a procedure for how to handle the telecommunications failure, such as a backup location.

Data Systems Destroyed

Fires will destroy data systems quickly. The disaster recovery plan should have a backup data centre or storage location where critical system information will be stored. It should be able to be easily accessed for quick recovery.

When a business creates a thorough disaster recovery plan, the chances of it staying out of commission are relatively low. In order to create an accurate plan, the business needs to honestly assess its risks. It also must honestly assess the impact those risks will have on its ability to operate. From there, a plan on how to act when disaster strikes and how to counteract the effects of that disaster can be drafted. This plan will be the difference between being closed for a short time and being closed for good.